Global Funding Opportunities

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Global Funding: WIN WIN Youth Award is Open to Applications

Posted by | 12/05/2020 | Global Funding Opportunities, Funding Opportunities in Ghana 2020

Global Funding: WIN WIN Youth Award is Open to Applications

WIN WIN Youth Award

The WIN WIN Youth Award (WIN WIN GOTHENBERG SUSTAINABILITY YOUTH AWARD) is an international award that aims to empower and reward young people who play an active role in the creation of a more sustainable future. The WIN WIN Youth Award is a part of the WIN WIN-organisation.

Since 2000 it has presented one of the world’s leading sustainability awards, the WIN WIN Gothenburg Sustainability Award. Previous winners of the WIN WIN Gothenburg Sustainability Award include Gro Harlem Brundtland, Al Gore and Kofi Annan.

The winner of the WIN WIN Youth Award will receive SEK 20.000 at the WIN WIN Award ceremony on October 22 in Gothenburg, Sweden.

We welcome contributions from individuals, organisations and movements from all over the world, with members between the age 13 to 29. Applicants to the WIN WIN Youth Award should present a recent or ongoing project/work/initiative linked to the theme 2020 – Biodiversity. The application deadline is Friday, June 5, 2020.

Theme 2020 – Biodiversity

One million of planet Earth’s eight million different species are threatened with extinction. This fact also jeopardizes humanity’s own survival as a species.

Despite scientists’ insight that the biodiversity of the Earth is crucial for our existence, the issue tends to fall between decision-makers’ areas of responsibility and does not receive the same attention as, for example, climate change.

The issue of biodiversity is complex and has a bearing on a very wide range of conditions for life on Earth – everything from clean water, raw materials and food production to genetic variation, inspiration for technical solutions and cures for diseases.

The multifaceted and intractable nature of the significance of biodiversity must not contribute to an inability to act. We need solutions and initiatives in many areas to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals number 14 and 15, which address ecosystems in the oceans and on land.

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UKRI GCRF/Newton Fund Agile Response COVID-19 Call

UKRI GCRF/Newton Fund

UKRI GCRF/Newton Fund invites proposals for short-term projects addressing and mitigating the health, social, economic, cultural and environmental impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak in Low and Middle Income Countries1.

This call is funded through the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) and the Newton Fund. These Funds address global challenges through disciplinary and interdisciplinary research and strengthen capability for research and innovation within both the UK and developing countries, providing an agile response to emergencies where there is an urgent research need. These Funds form part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitment.

Researchers holding existing UKRI GCRF grants should in the first instance consider whether they could repurpose that funding to address the objectives of this call. You can apply to switch your existing funding here. Repurposing your existing grant is the quickest way to start the research.

  • Project length: up to 18 months
  • Eligibility: UK applicants must be eligible to receive Research Council funding.
    Additional eligibility rules apply for international applicants, please see below
  • Closing date: none – apply at any time
  • Funding: 80% of the full economic cost (fEC) for Research Council funding.
    Additional funding rules apply for international applicants, please see below
  • The primary benefit of proposals should be to any Low and Middle income Countries (LMICs) likely to be negatively impacted by COVID-19.
  • Award range: there is no specific budget for this call. We are interested in funding research of any scale that can demonstrate it will deliver impact during the lifetime of the project.

COVID-19 is fundamentally a global crisis. The pandemic presents an unprecedented challenge, threatening the lives and livelihoods of millions of people around the world. While the epicentre of the pandemic is currently focused around Europe and the US, a growing number of cases are reported in Africa, the Middle East, and Central, South America and Asia with potentially serious social, economic and political consequences for these regions. Some of the poorest societies in the world will be the least prepared and most vulnerable to the effects of the virus. Other Low and Middle Income Countries may however have experiences, for example from TB / HIV / Ebola, of responding to epidemics from which they and the rest of the world can learn.

UKRI will support excellent proposals which meet at least one of the following:

  • New research or innovation with a clear pathway to impact on policy or practice that has the potential (within the period of the award) to deliver a significant contribution to the understanding of, response to, and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic in a developing country context.
  • Supports the manufacture and/or wide scale adoption of an intervention with significant potential for impact in developing countries.
  • Gathers critical data and resources quickly for future research use.

Applications for funding that do not, as their primary objective, benefit the welfare of low or middle income countries should apply instead to the UKRI open call for funding to address the impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak.

See our regularly updated list of research and innovation projects and other awards supported by UKRI

You will need to show that you can start work within 4 weeks of the funding being confirmed.

An individual can be Principal Investigator (PI) on only one bid at any one time. You may support others as co-investigator, as long as you have the capacity/bandwidth to do so without detriment to the project you lead.

You may be asked to become part of wider consortia or join with already existing efforts.

Applying from within the UK

Proposals will be accepted by anyone based in a UK Research Organisation (RO) eligible to receive funding from UKRI Research Councils or based in approved Research Organisations overseas (see applying from overseas, below). This does not include companies or SMEs that would be eligible to receive Innovate UK funding.

It is expected that proposals will engage equitably with research organisations, other organisations, and communities in the partner countries or LMIC countries where impact will be delivered. Proposals must have a minimum of one LMIC Co-Investigator and where possible we would expect involvement of Co-Investigators from the country/ countries in which the study is situated.

Applying from outside the UK

We strongly encourage applicants from LMIC countries to apply to and participate in this call. LMIC country Principal Investigators from an organisation that lead or have previously led and held UKRI grants and have undergone Je-S registration and due diligence checks are eligible to be lead applicants for this call. The LMIC-based organisation must be able to receive and manage funds from UKRI via a grant and must ensure their application complies with local regulations and has the necessary local approvals.

Support for applicants from outside the UK

This call will cover 100% fEC costs for Principal and Co-Investigators from LMICs. This applies to Investigators from Low and Middle Income Countries identified on the OECD DAC list of ODA recipients.

International co-investigators from countries not on the DAC list are permitted on proposals and this call will cover 100% fEC of costs for such collaborators. However, salary costs need to be clearly justified and their total cost of the proposal must not exceed 30% of fEC. International co-investigators from countries not on the DAC list are expected to make a significant contribution to their own research costs, including covering their own overheads.

From 2020/21, the UK’s partnerships with China and India under the Global Challenges Research Fund and the Newton Fund will have a renewed focus on delivering global development impact. The UK will continue to work in close partnership with these countries on cutting-edge research, with the primary objective of delivering benefit to developing countries around the world, as well as secondary benefits in the UK, China and India.

Applications that include Co-Investigators from China and India should clearly justify salary costs. Total costs of grant components from China and India are limited to 30% of the fEC of the proposal. It is expected that international co-investigators from China and India make a significant contribution to their own research costs, including covering their own overheads. Applicants from China and India are not eligible to be Principal Investigators under this call.

Health impacts

In parallel to this agile responsive call, a strategic ODA Cross-Departmental call is being explored by UKRI/DHSC/DFID for research proposals addressing COVID-19 in LMICs. This strategic call will be focused on specific health priorities outlined in the WHO R&D Blueprint COVID-19 Roadmap, addressing gaps identified in the current health research agenda through a consultative process that involved experts from across the world. For proposals likely to fit within this remit, please await further notice about this strategic opportunity before applying to the Agile UKRI call. Topics likely to be in scope are:

  • Epidemiological studies
  • Clinical characterization and management
  • Infection prevention and control including health care workers’ protection
  • Social Sciences in the Outbreak Response (access to health care services/vaccination etc) NOT socio-economic generally

Research and innovation is at the heart of the global response to COVID-19. Focused upon, and closely working in partnership with LMICs, the GCRF and Newton Fund are very well placed to enable the best researchers in the UK and internationally to respond and recover from this global crisis. This agile response programme enables the GCRF and Newton Fund to build on their current portfolios addressing the Sustainable Development Goals in order to help mitigate negative impacts in developing countries of the COVID-19 outbreak. Proposals supported through this programme will contribute to the strategic aims of the 6 portfolio areas:

  • Resilience
  • Security Protracted Conflict, Refugee Crises and Forced Displacement
  • Cities and Sustainable Infrastructure
  • Food Systems
  • Education
  • Global Health

Further information can be found on the GCRF website and Newton Fund website.

This GCRF/Newton Fund call focuses upon mitigating both short and longer-term impacts of COVID-19 on health, wellbeing, community cohesion, and economic prosperity. In the health sphere, mental health, health economics, and malnutrition are all impacted by the virus and require interdisciplinary research. As well as a health emergency, COVID-19 highlights the importance of understanding underlying determinants of risk in LMICs, including the quality of public messaging and community engagement, the vulnerabilities of those living in refugee and IDP (internally displaced person) camps and informal settlements, higher incidences of domestic violence resulting from social isolation, remittances from overseas, impacts upon global food systems and supply chains and severely restricted access to education.

You will need to show why it is not possible to resource the work by repurposing existing funds you may have available.

Proposals should:

  • Describe the unmet need developing countries are facing with COVID-19, and how the primary benefit of your research will be realised in these countries.
  • Focus on working in close partnership with LMICs to enable the best researchers and innovators in the UK and developing countries to jointly contribute to recovery from this global crisis.
  • Clearly demonstrate how the proposed research meets the criteria for ODA compliance and Gender Equality.
  • Explain the level of urgency, and why the activity is important now.
  • Demonstrate that the proposal has the necessary critical mass to make a difference, including the global partnerships that will be necessary to realise impact in LMIC countries.
  • Demonstrate their commitment to minimizing the burden their project will place on others. Given the urgency and the demands the development of the proposal and carrying out of the project will place on others, applicants should be mindful of the burden they place on individuals and organisations, both in the UK and overseas. This includes consideration of how to conduct fieldwork and other activities.
  • Demonstrate a clear route to impact within the timescale of the project. Where relevant, this should include demonstration of links to relevant decision makers both in the UK and overseas.
  • Give an estimate of the resources required (within 10%).
  • Name the team that will run this and describe their ability and capacity to deliver including details of how research would be conducted under current restrictions (travel, social distancing) and highlight any requirements for personal protective equipment.
  • Provide evidence that the host institutions support the proposal and that the research can be carried out under present institutional restriction.

Getting approval from your host institution

You need approval to confirm that the work is achievable under whatever constraints are currently in place in your department/university. UK institutions must confirm that they are content for you to focus on this work under 80%fEC funding.

Eligible LMIC institutions must confirm that they have previously been awarded UKRI funding and have the processes in place to be able to receive and manage funds from UKRI via a grant; all organisations must also ensure their application complies with local regulations and has the necessary local approvals.

The approval can be from whoever has authority to give such assurance whether that is your department head, university research office or pro-VCs office.

Please note that we would like to see evidence that work could begin within four weeks of confirmation of funding.

Data and software sharing and open access requirements

Data produced as a result of this funding will need to be shared in line with the Joint statement on sharing research data and findings relevant to the novel coronavirus (nCoV) outbreak, to which UKRI is a signatory.

Software, such as analysis scripts, spreadsheets, or modelling codes, created as part of the work under this funding should be similarly shared.

Examples of suitable data depositories include:

Software, analysis scripts and modelling codes should be made available through a version control service such as Github or Gitlab.

Proposals that are out of scope

These include:

  • A proposal where the primary focus is not a DAC list country. The primary focus must be on a country or countries on the DAC list that is not flagged as likely to graduate. Any proposals that do not have a primary focus on a developing country or countries will not be eligible.
  • Funding to directly mitigate the effects of the pandemic on specific institutions and businesses.
  • A proposal that is more appropriate to other existing funding calls and /or other research funders. These include proposals that are not specifically addressing developing countries, but have the involvement of international collaborators, these applicants can apply to the UK-focused UKRI call.
  • Longer term research proposals that address the COVID-19 emergency or future pandemics that don’t meet the urgency guidelines. These proposals should be submitted through normal responsive mode.
  • Those proposals that were rejected after assessment, or currently have an application submitted to the UKRI Open call for research and innovation ideas to address COVID-19

GCRF and the Newton Fund form part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitment, which is monitored by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). ODA-funded activity focuses on outcomes that promote the long-term sustainable growth of countries on the OECD Development Assistance Committee DAC list. Funding within this call will therefore be awarded in a manner that fits with Official ODA guidelines.

To comply with ODA requirements, applications must make clear how their primary purpose is to promote the economic development and welfare of a developing country or countries. There are no priority countries, proposals may relate to any country or countries on the DAC list except those which are flagged as likely to graduate from the list during the course of the proposed project. If a country is flagged as likely to graduate it cannot be the primary focus of a proposal, although it can be included as an additional case study or comparison.

From 2020/21, the UK’s partnerships with China and India under the Global Challenges Research Fund and the Newton Fund will have a renewed focus on delivering global development impact. The UK will continue to work in close partnership with these countries on cutting-edge research, with the primary objective of delivering benefit to developing countries around the world, as well as secondary benefits in the UK, China and India.

Please note, successful applicants will be required to submit a full 1 page ODA compliance statement as a pre-requisite to funding. UKRI reserve the right to reject the application if the ODA compliance statement is deemed insufficient.

Further guidance for applicants on the ODA compliance statements is available here (PDF, 327KB).

Equitable Partnerships

Equitable Partnerships are a key pillar of the GCRF and Newton Fund. UKRI developed the following statement of expectation for research partnerships in consultation with researchers from East Africa: Partnerships should be transparent and based on mutual respect. Partnerships should aim to have clearly articulated equitable distribution of resources, responsibilities, efforts and benefits. Partnerships should recognise different inputs, different interests and different desired outcomes and should ensure the ethical sharing and use of data which is responsive to the identified needs of society. Further guidance on how to develop and maintain equitable research partnerships can be found below.

To comply with the International Development (Gender Equality) Act 2014, applications must briefly outline how they have taken meaningful yet proportionate consideration as to how the project will contribute to reducing gender inequalities in the Gender Equality section of the application form.

Please note successful applicants will be required to submit a full 1 page gender equality statement as a pre-requisite to funding. UKRI reserve the right to reject the application if no consideration has been given to gender equality or if the proposal is assessed to result in a negative impact for gender equality.

Further guidance for applicants on the gender equality statements is available.

 

To apply you need to:

  1. Fill in the proposal application form (Word, 53KB)All proposals must utilise the provided form and be accompanied by:
    • The regulatory requirements annex that forms part of the application form.
    • An optional document of supporting figures, GANTT chart and/or data tables (no more than 1xA4 page). If this is included, applications must be collated into a single pdf in the following order – Form plus Annex, Document of supporting figures, GANTT chart and/or data tables
  2. Email your single PDF to UKRI GCRFCV19

Please ensure you set out clearly answers to all questions asked on the form, as incomplete proposals will be rejected.

Receipt will be acknowledged within 2 working days and in most circumstances, PIs will have an initial response on the proposal within 10 working days.

Proposals should be sent through this route for any research or innovation relevant to the above regardless of funding Council or whether relevant to multiple Councils.

Information relating to proposals may be shared, on a confidential basis, across UKRI councils, and with other organisations to support the national and international coordination of research to combat COVID-19 and to seek funding contributions from third parties.

Given the rapid developments in this and other funding calls addressing CV19, we are constantly reviewing our processes to ensure we are reducing bureaucracy and keeping things as simple as possible. In light of this we have simplified the application form, removing the need for detailed financial information at the first stage.

How we will assess your application

All requests for repurposing and new grants will be considered by a UKRI GCRF/Newton Fund Agile Response Panel.

You may be asked for more information before a grant is confirmed

Visit the official scholarship website here

Alibaba Get Challenge 2020 – Register Now

Alibaba Get Challenge 2020

Take advantage of the Alibaba Get Challenge 2020 program to create impactful digital solutions for individuals, businesses and institutions impacted by the coronavirus pandemic and get rewarded with awesome prizes

Eligibility
  1. Open to individuals 18-30 years of age
  2. Teams of 3-5 people with at least one member able to communicate effectively in English Language
  3. Have a new business idea or a running business that is less than 1 year old
  4. Have not received more than $100,000 funding for the current project

Timelines

  1. Initial applications and First Round selections: 
    April 10, 2020 – May 4, 2020
  2. Online Training and Second Round Selections:
    May 9, 2020 – June 5, 2020
  3. Business Execution and Regional Selection:
    June 11, 2020 – August 11, 2020
  4. Regional Finals:
    August 13 – 15, 2020
  5. Global Finals:
    August 17 – 25 2020

Application Link

WII and Beyond International Graduate Student Essay Competition 2020

WII and Beyond International Graduate Student Essay Competition

In the run up to the 20th anniversary of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 (UNSCR 1325 (2000)) Women In International Security (WIIS) and the Heinrich Böll Foundation Washington, DC are launching an international graduate student essay competition:WII and Beyond International Graduate Student Essay Competition

The WII and Beyond International Graduate Student Essay Competition is intended to highlight innovative and imaginative ideas and strategies to achieve the objectives of 1325 in the 2020s. We hope they will provide important input for the 20th anniversary deliberations of UNSCR 1325.

Over the last two decades political leaders around the world have made a series of grand public declarations and formal commitments to gender equality and the advancement of the role of women in peace and security issues. Unfortunately, there is still an enormous gap between these pronouncements and aspirations and effective policy and real-world progress.

UNSCR 1325 on Women, Peace and Security (WPS) was adopted in October 2000. It called on all UN member-states and the UN Secretary-General to: (1) increase the representation and participation of women in conflict prevention and conflict resolution processes, including in security institutions; (2) integrate gender perspectives in the analysis of international security issues; and (3) adopt special measures to protect women and girls from gender-based violence in conflict settings. Nine subsequent UN Security Council resolutions have reinforced and refined the WPS agenda.

Regional organizations as diverse as the African Union (AU), the European Union (EU), and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) have developed organization-wide policies and Action Plans to incorporate the guidance from UNSCR 1325 into their deliberations  and actions. At the national level, some 81 states have developed National Action Plans and adopted legislation to implement and advance the WPS Agenda. Civil society organizations have played important roles in mobilizing governments and international organizations. All these actions have been important steps forward and necessary for progress, yet they have not been sufficient. Progress towards the goals of the WPS agenda has been limited and uneven. Even where progress has been made, many of the gains are vulnerable and potentially reversible.

The underrepresentation of women in national and international security institutions and deliberations remains glaring. Gender perspectives are insufficiently integrated into analyses of national and international security challenges. In addition, violence against women and girls has continued at horrifying levels, especially in conflict settings.

The Competition: 1325AndBeyond

The 1325AndBeyond competition aims to highlight innovative and imaginative strategies to achieve the objectives of 1325 in the next decade—the 2020s. The top five essays will be recognized and will receive a monetary award.

First place winner $1,325; Second place winner $1,000; Third place winner $750; Fourth and fifth place $250

Essay Focus – UNSCR 1325 and Beyond

Essays must focus on the future—the next decade, specifically. The question is how best to move the objectives of UNSCR 1325 and the WPS agenda forward in the 2020s, given the successes and failures of the last two decades.

  • Essays must contain specific and practical (realistic) recommendations for civil society,
    states, and/or international organizations.
  • Essays can focus on only one international actor (e.g. civil society, a particular state or group of states, the United Nations, a regional organization) or on a multitude of international actors.

Essay Eligibility

Essay submissions are open to young professionals with an MA or higher academic degree, and students currently enrolled in a MA, PhD, JD or corresponding graduate program at a university or equivalent academic institution in 2020. Recent graduates, as well as individuals who will be enrolled in a graduate program within the next academic year, will also be considered. All genders are encouraged to apply

Essay Requirements

    1. Essays must be the individuals’ own original pieces of work, not previously published;
    2. Essays must be written in the English language and be between 1,500 and 2,000 words;
    3. Submissions must also include: (1) a 250-word summary; (2) a bibliography; (3) a brief biography; Optional: a copy of school/university enrollment; Optional – a photo.
    4. The biography should include: a) full name of individual; b) name of the school or university and program in which the student is enrolled OR individual’s employment information; c) individual contact information (email and phone number);
    5. Essays must be typed (single spaced) in 12-point Times New Roman and submitted in both Word and PDF format;
    6. Essays and other submission requirements must be submitted by May 10th 2020 at midnight
      EST to the online submission form.

Evaluation Criteria

An international jury of scholars and practitioners will evaluate the essays. Essays will be judged on clarity and clear elaboration of arguments as well as the innovative and original nature of policy-recommendations. Winners will be announced on June 30th 2020.

Comments Off on Healthcare Innovator Awards Welcomes Great Ideas in Healthcare Innovationa

Healthcare Innovator Awards Welcomes Great Ideas in Healthcare Innovationa

Posted by | 30/04/2020 | Funding Opportunities in Ghana 2020, Funding Opportunities in Africa 2020, Global Funding Opportunities

Healthcare Innovator Awards Welcomes Great Ideas in Healthcare Innovationa

Innovator Awards

The Healthcare Innovator Awards  support researchers who are transforming great ideas into healthcare innovations that could have a significant impact on human health.

Level of funding for the Innovator Awards:

Up to £500,000, or up to £750,000 for multidisciplinary collaborations

Duration of funding:

Usually up to 24 months, or up to 36 months for multidisciplinary collaborations

Who can apply for the Innovator Awards

Innovator Awards are open to researchers who are developing healthcare innovations that could have a major and measurable impact on human health.

Individuals and teams from not-for-profit and commercial organisations can apply.

Organisations can be of any size, based anywhere in the world (apart from mainland China).

Funded organisations must sign up to our grant conditions (see the template award letters in the ‘How to apply’ section on this page).

You can work in any scientific discipline, including a discipline outside life sciences. You can work on any type of technology. Examples of technologies include:

  • therapeutics (small molecules or biologics)
  • vaccines
  • devices
  • diagnostics
  • digital technologies
  • regenerative medicine.

The work that you propose must be essential for developing your healthcare innovation.

Multidisciplinary collaborations and partnerships

We particularly encourage proposals from multidisciplinary collaborations within or between organisations. These collaborations do not need to include life sciences researchers.

In your proposal, you must:

  • include researchers from at least two different scientific disciplines
  • include at least one researcher from a discipline outside life sciences, such as (but not limited to) engineering, physical science or data science
  • describe the added value of the collaboration, and tell us why the outcome(s) of your work will be unique and only achievable through this approach.

We also encourage partnerships between not-for-profit and commercial organisations. We expect most commercial organisations that partner not-for-profit organisations to provide in-kind contributions in addition to Wellcome’s funding.

If your proposal is successful and involves collaborators or partnerships, you must all enter into an agreement stating:

  • who will own any IP that arises from this award
  • the necessary background IP licences
  • how you plan to protect, maintain and commercialise Wellcome-funded IP.

This agreement has to be in place before we will provide funding.

This agreement must be consistent with the template award letter for your organisation (see the ‘How to apply’ section on this page).

For guidance, read the university and business collaboration agreements: model heads of terms agreements(opens in a new tab) on GOV.UK.

Your Innovator Awards proposal

In your proposal, you should describe:

  • the global burden of the disease or condition that you want to address
  • the unmet healthcare need
  • the patient population that you want to reach and the impact that your healthcare innovation could have on their health
  • why your healthcare innovation will be significantly better than anything that’s already available or being developed
  • the evidence supporting your proof of concept
  • what you will do with our funding (eg key experiments and project deliverables) to move your project on to the next stage of development
  • your team’s expertise and the resources available to you
  • your long-term aims beyond this award.

Past and current innovations award holders

If you’re one of our past or current innovations award holders, you can apply for an Innovator Award if you propose to develop a healthcare innovation that we haven’t funded.

Who can’t apply

You’re not eligible for an Innovator Award if your company is not established and/or doesn’t have working capital.

We won’t consider proposals for:

  • incremental improvements in healthcare
  • ‘blue skies’ or curiosity-driven research
  • back-up or me-too drugs
  • research about the distribution and uptake of healthcare innovations
  • delivering health services
  • public health interventions
  • one-off costs that don’t include key experiments, such as manufacturing a drug substance.

We don’t usually consider proposals for phase III or IV clinical trials for therapeutics or vaccines. If you’re proposing this kind of trial, please contact us. We’ll tell you if we want you to apply.

If you’ve previously been unsuccessful in getting Wellcome funding for your healthcare innovation, you must contact us before you apply again. You can’t usually apply again unless your proposal has changed significantly.

 

An Innovator Award provides up to £500,000 of funding and usually lasts up to 24 months. For multidisciplinary collaborations, awards are up to £750,000 and have a duration of up to 36 months.

You should ask for a level and duration of funding that’s justifiable for your proposed activities.

Our support includes:

  • We will cover the salary costs of all staff, full or part time, who will work on your project. Staff members typically include research assistants or technicians employed on your grant. If you’re doing fieldwork or clinical studies in a low- or middle-income country, we’ll consider requests for more research staff.

    We don’t usually provide a salary for the lead applicant for this scheme. But if you, or any applicants, hold a permanent, open-ended or long-term rolling contract and have to get your salary from external grant funding, you can ask us for this in your application. See the ‘Eligibility and suitability’ section above for more information.

    We don’t provide studentship stipends.

    Visa and work permit costs

    If you have named people on your grant whose salaries will be funded by Wellcome, you can ask for visa or work permit costs to help them take up their posts at the host organisation. You can also ask for:

      • visa costs for the person’s partner and dependent children
      • essential associated costs, such as travel to attend appointments at a visa application centre or embassy if you can justify these
      • Immigration Health Surcharge costs for the person, their partner and dependent children if they will be in the UK for six months or more.
  • We will pay for the materials and consumables you need to carry out your proposed research, including:

    • laboratory chemicals and materials (eg reagents, isotopes, peptides, enzymes, antibodies, gases, proteins, cell/tissue/bacterial culture, plasticware and glassware)
    • associated charges for shipping, delivery and freight.
  • You can ask for funds to buy animals if they are essential to your project. We will also fund the charge-out rates for animal house facilities if your organisation uses full economic costing methodology. These costs include:

    • running costs (including animal maintenance, any experimental procedures, licences and relevant staff training)
    • appropriate estates costs
    • cage and equipment depreciation costs, but not building depreciation costs.

    We may not pay the full charge-out rate for an animal house facility if we’ve provided significant funding towards the infrastructure and/or core support of the facility.

    If your organisation doesn’t use full economic costing methodology to establish charge-out rates for animal house facilities, you can ask for funds to cover:

    • the cost of buying animals
    • running costs (including animal maintenance, any experimental procedures, licences and relevant staff training)
    • staff costs, eg contributions towards the salaries of animal house technicians.

    We won’t provide estates or depreciation costs.

  • You can ask for the cost of access to shared equipment or facilities if they’re essential to your research project. These may include materials and consumables, plus a proportion of:

    • maintenance and service contracts
    • staff time costs for dedicated technical staff employed to operate the equipment or facility.

    We don’t cover the costs of:

    • estates and utilities
    • depreciation or insurance
    • other staff eg contributions towards departmental technical, administrative and management staff time.

    If the facilities or equipment were paid for by a Wellcome grant, you can only ask for access charges if:

    • the grant has ended
    • any support for running costs and maintenance contracts has ended.
  • We’ve changed our overheads policy for grant applications submitted from 1 October 2019. Read our updated policy and the ‘How to ask for these costs’ section below.

    How to ask for these costs

    This process applies if you’re now eligible to ask for overhead costs.

    In your application you must:

    • give a full breakdown of costs (you can’t ask for a percentage of the research costs)
    • explain why these costs are necessary for your research
    • include a letter from the finance director of your host organisation, confirming that the breakdown is a true representation of the costs incurred.

    Our previous policy

    This information applies to grant applications submitted up to 30 September 2019.

    We cover research management and support costs if:

    • your host organisation is in a low- or middle-income country and your grant will be directly awarded to that organisation,

    or

    • part of your grant will be sub-contracted to an organisation in a low- or middle-income country.

    We don’t cover these costs if your host organisation will include the sub-contracted funding in its annual report to the UK Charity Research Support Fund.

    They can include:

    • training costs, eg transferable skills and personal development training for you and any other people employed on your grant
    • costs for short-term professional training for administrative, technical and support staff
    • administration, eg grant management, technical and administrative services
    • other costs which are necessary for your research, eg computing and internet access costs, access to electronic resources, facility and running costs such as utilities, furniture, waste disposal and incineration, and building maintenance.

    The total research management and support costs should not be more than 20% of the direct research costs you’re requesting.

    See a list of low- and middle-income countries.

  • You can ask for these costs if you are applying from a university, a not-for-profit organisation or a small company.

    Travel costs

    Conference attendance

    You can ask for a contribution towards the costs of attending scientific and academic meetings and conferences, including registration fees and the costs to offset the carbon emissions of your travel. The limits are:

        • Lead applicant – £2,000 a year
        • Applicants who are asking for a salary on the grant – £2,000 a year
        • Staff employed on your grant – £1,000 each a year

    You’ll need to specify the amount you’re requesting for each person.

    You can also ask for costs to cover caring responsibilities if any staff employed on your grant attend a conference. This includes childcare and any other caring responsibility they have, provided:

        • Wellcome is paying their salary
        • the conference is directly related to the research
        • the caring costs are over and above what they’d normally pay for care
        • the conference organiser and their employing organisation are unable to cover the costs.

    You can ask for up to £1,000 per person for each conference.

    Collaborative travel

    You can ask for travel and subsistence costs for collaborative visits for you and any staff employed on your grant. You’ll need to justify each visit and its duration.

    Other travel

    We will pay for other essential visits, eg to facilities, for sample collection and for fieldwork. You can include subsistence costs.

    Carbon offset costs

    This is a new policy. It applies to all types of travel costs Wellcome provides.

    You can ask for:

        • the cost of low carbon travel where practical, even if it’s more expensive (for example travelling by train instead of flying)
        • project-related resources or activities that provide an alternative to travel, such as video conferencing, communication and file-sharing software
        • costs to offset the carbon emissions of the journeys you make.

    We won’t pay for the core infrastructure that your host organisation should provide, unless you’re eligible to ask for these costs under our overheads policy. Examples of these costs include:

        • organisation-wide video conferencing packages
        • high-speed broadband
        • HD screens.

    See our carbon offset policy for travel for information on what you and your organisation need to do.

    Subsistence costs

    If you’re away for up to one month you can ask for subsistence costs. These include accommodation, meals and incidentals (eg refreshments or newspapers).

    If your administering organisation has a subsistence policy, use their rates.

    If your administering organisation doesn’t have a subsistence policy, please use the HMRC rates(opens in a new tab).

    If you’re away for more than one month and up to 12 months, we will pay reasonable rental costs only, including aparthotels. You should discuss appropriate rates with your administering and host organisations, or Wellcome, as appropriate. We expect you to choose the most economical options, booked in advance where possible.

    If you’re from a low- or middle- income country and will be working in a high-income country for more than one month and up to 12 months, you can also ask for up to £10 a day to cover extra costs, such as transport and incidentals.

    If you’re away for more than 12 months, we will pay the costs of your housing. You should discuss your needs with your administering and host organisations.

    The allowance we provide will be based on family and business need. We will set the maximum allowance we pay for each location. This will be based on current market data or, where data is unavailable, in consultation with your administering organisation, using equivalent market rates. Please contact us if you need help calculating the costs.

    We will cover the direct expenses you have to pay to find and rent a home. We will not cover the cost of utilities or any refurbishment.

    Overseas research

    If you or any research staff employed on your grant will be doing research away from your home laboratory, we’ll help with the additional costs of working on the project overseas. Please see the ‘Overseas allowances’ section for details.

  • We’ll help you with the additional costs of working on the project overseas if you are:

        • applying from a university, a not-for-profit organisation or a small company
        • you or any staff employed on your grant will be spending time in another country.

    Our overseas allowances are:

        • a contribution towards the personal cost of carrying out research overseas, to ensure that you are not disadvantaged
        • provided on the assumption that you’ll be paying income tax, either in your home country, or the country you will be working in (your personal tax is your responsibility).
        • provided on the understanding that you or your partner will not receive equivalent allowances from elsewhere
        • determined by the amount of time you will spend away from your home country.

     

    See a list of low- and middle-income countries, as defined by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

    You can ask for the following allowances. You need to provide estimated costs as accurately as possible.

        • We will pay your travel costs at the beginning and end of your overseas work. Costs can be for air, ferry, train or coach fares.

          All fares should be:

        • If you are away for up to 12 months, you can ask for up to 80kg of additional baggage or unaccompanied airline freight for your outward and return journeys.

          If you are away for more than 12 months, you can ask for the costs of shipping your personal items at the beginning and end of your overseas work.

          We will pay the full cost of transporting:

          • half a standard shipping container if you’re travelling alone
          • a whole standard shipping container (20ft) if you’re travelling with a partner and/or dependants.
        • We will pay the cost of your medical insurance and travel insurance.

          If you will be working in a low- or middle-income country we will also cover the cost of emergency evacuation cover.

          We won’t pay for medical insurance if you will be based in the UK or Republic of Ireland.

        • We will pay the costs of visas, vaccinations and anti-malaria treatment.

        • You can ask for this if you’ll be based in a low- or middle-income country and it is necessary.

          Costs can include guards, panic buttons and alarms. You should ask your employing organisation for advice on the level of security you need.

        • If you’re away for up to one month you can ask for subsistence costs. These include accommodation, meals and incidentals (eg refreshments or newspapers).

          If your administering organisation has a subsistence policy, use their rates.

          If your administering organisation doesn’t have a subsistence policy, please use the HMRC rates(opens in a new tab).

          If you’re away for more than one month and up to 12 months, we will pay reasonable rental costs only, including aparthotels. You should discuss appropriate rates with your administering and host organisations, or Wellcome, as appropriate. We expect you to choose the most economical options, booked in advance where possible.

          If you’re from a low- or middle- income country and will be working in a high-income country for more than one month and up to 12 months, you can also ask for up to £10 a day to cover extra costs, such as transport and incidentals.

          If you’re away for more than 12 months, we will pay the costs of your housing. You should discuss your needs with your administering and host organisations.

          The allowance we provide will be based on family and business need. We will set the maximum allowance we pay for each location. This will be based on current market data or, where data is unavailable, in consultation with your administering organisation, using equivalent market rates. If you need help calculating the costs please contact Grants Management.

          We will cover the direct expenses you have to pay to find and rent a home. We will not cover the cost of utilities or any refurbishment.

        • If you’re away for more than 12 months we will pay:

          Local nursery or school fees

          You can ask for these costs if you are in a location where there isn’t free local education of the same standard as in your home country.

          Costs include:

          • local nursery school fees up to a maximum of 30 hours a week for 3 to 4 year olds
          • local junior or secondary school fees, up to the end of secondary school education.

          Local international school fees

          You can ask for these costs if local schools do not provide the same standard of education as in your home country. We will only pay the published termly school fees.

          We will not cover the costs of:

          • extracurricular activities, including field trips
          • other extras including, but not limited to, uniforms, sports kit and equipment, transport, meals, books and electronic equipment.

          Boarding school fees

          We will consider paying the cost of boarding school fees in your home country if:

          • a local international school is not available
          • both parents, guardians or the sole care giver live outside the home country.

          The allowance covers:

          • up to a maximum of £30,000 a year for each child for the published termly fees only
          • the cost of return airfares at the start and end of each school term, in line with our carbon offset policy for travel.

          We will not cover the costs of:

          • additional annual leave airfares
          • extracurricular activities, including field trips
          • other extras including, but not limited to, uniforms, sports kit and equipment, transport, meals, books and electronic equipment.

          We will cover the cost of providing special needs education as far as possible. Please contact us to discuss your needs.

          We would not usually expect to provide an education allowance if you will be working in a high-income country.

        • If you will be away for more than 12 months, we’ll pay for you to travel back to your home country for annual leave. This is in addition to your outward and return travel costs and depends on how long you will be away:

          • 12-24 months – 1 annual leave trip
          • 25-36 months – 2 annual leave trips
          • 37-48 months – 3 annual leave trips
          • 49-60 months – 4 annual leave trips
          • 61-72 months – 5 annual leave trips.

          All fares should be:

        • If you will be away for more than 12 months, you can ask for up to 100 hours of lessons in the local language for you and/or your partner during the first 12 months of your visit.

          We will cover 100% of the costs for local language school classes or up to 50% of the costs of individual tuition.

          We will not cover the cost of examinations or personal learning materials such as DVDs and books.

  • We will provide funds if you need to outsource project work to:

    • contract research organisations
    • other fee-for-service providers.
  • If you are applying from a university we will add an inflation allowance to your award.

    How we calculate your inflation allowance

    Your inflation allowance is based on your total eligible costs and the duration of the award. If the costs in your application are in pounds sterling, euros or US dollars, you’ll receive the following allowance:

    Award duration (in months) Inflation allowance
    0-12 0.0%
    13-24 1.0%
    25-36 2.0%
    37-48 3.0%
    49-60 4.1%
    61-72 5.1%
    73-84 6.2%

    These rates are calculated using compound inflation at 2.0% a year from Year 2 onwards.

    If your costs are in any other currency, we will use an inflation allowance that reflects the inflation rate of the country where the host organisation is based.

    What to include in your application

    The costs in your application must be based on current known costs, excluding inflation.

    You should allow for salary pay awards during Year 1. These should be based on pay awards already agreed; if you don’t know what the pay award is yet then use our inflation rate.

    Wellcome’s studentship stipend scales for non-clinical/basic science PhD studentships include an annual increase for inflation.

  • If your organisation receives block funding through the UK’s Charity Open Access Fund (COAF) you can ask them to cover your open access article processing charges.

    If you’re at an organisation that doesn’t receive COAF funding, we’ll supplement your grant when your paper has been accepted for publication.

    You can’t ask for these charges in your grant application.

  • We will cover the costs for an experienced project manager. They will be responsible for managing and coordinating the day-to-day project activities and communications within your organisation and between collaborators and sub-contractors.

  • If you need to carry out clinical trials or research using NHS patients or facilities, we will cover some of the research costs.

    Annex A of the guidelines for attributing the costs of health and social care research and development (AcoRD)(opens in a new tab) sets out the costs we cover, and which costs should be funded through the Department of Health in England, or its equivalent in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. If you’re based in the Republic of Ireland, we would expect you to adhere to the spirit of these principles.

    Further information on our clinical trials policy.

  • Costs you may ask for (you will have to justify these costs in your application):

    • fieldwork costs, including survey and data collection and statistical analysis
    • specialist publications that are relevant to the research and not available in institutional libraries
    • consultancy fees
    • expenses for subjects and volunteers – includes recruitment of participants, their participatory fees and travel, as well as interviewee expenses
    • reasonable research-associated costs related to the feedback of health-related findings but not any healthcare-associated costs
    • costs associated with developing an outputs management plan
    • questionnaires, recruitment material, newsletters etc for clinical, epidemiological and qualitative research studies
    • public engagement materials where dissemination (including printing and publishing) is a key activity of the project
    • recruitment, advertising and interviewee travel costs for staff to be employed on the grant
    • purchase, hire and running costs of project-dedicated vehicles.

    Costs we won’t pay:

    • estates costs – such as building and premises costs, basic services and utilities. This also includes phone, postage, photocopying and stationery, unless you can justify these within a clinical or epidemiological study.*
    • page charges and the cost of colour prints
    • research, technical and administrative staff whose time is shared across several projects and isn’t supported by an audit record*
    • charge-out costs for major facilities* – departmental technical and administrative services, and use of existing equipment
    • cleaning, waste and other disposal costs*

    *We will fund these costs in the case of animal-related research.

    • indirect costs – this includes general administration costs such as personnel, finance, library, room hire and some departmental services
    • office furniture, such as chairs, desks, filing cabinets, etc.
    • clothing such as lab coats, shoes, protective clothing
    • non-research related activities, eg catering, room and venue hire for staff parties, team-building events and social activities
    • indemnity insurance (insurance cover against claims made by subjects or patients associated with a research programme)
    • ethics reviews, unless you are in a low- or middle-income country
    • radiation protection costs.

You can also apply for Research Enrichment funding to increase the impact of your work through activities in public engagement, open research, and diversity and inclusion.

If you’re awarded this grant

If your host organisation is in the UK and you have team members who will spend at least 50% of their working time contributing to the award, they may be eligible to apply for a Tier 1 Global Talent visa through the endorsed funder route.

What we don’t offer

  • Salary recovery costs for staff funded full-time by the employing organisation.
  • Indirect costs.
  • Working capital costs of commercial organisations.
  • Fees for academic courses such as Master’s degrees or PhDs, and other tuition fees.
  • Costs for large equipment.
  • Costs for capital build or refurbishment.

We don’t fund overheads unless they’re included on this page (for example research management and support costs)

NB. This awards is recurrent every three months. You can consider bookmarking this page for your future reference.

HOW TO APPLY